India Should Call Truce in U.S. Trade Conflict By Bloomberg


India Should Call Truce in U.S. Trade Conflict

(Bloomberg Opinion) — U.S. and Indian officials are meeting in New Delhi today for what promises to be a tetchy summit. The trade relationship between their countries has never been easy. The fact that India has a $22-billion trade surplus with the U.S. — despite running a deficit with many of its other major trading partners — is particularly annoying to the Trump administration. The total might seem insignificant compared to America’s $566 billion trade deficit with China. For its own sake, though, India would be wise to address rather than try to minimize U.S. complaints.

That’s not only because the U.S. seems to be preparing heavy-duty retaliation. It might remove Indian exports from the “General System of Preferences” tariff plan, which ensures that about 2,000 different kinds of goods — “product lines,” as the trade negotiators call them — can be imported into the U.S. without any tariffs being levied. Washington seems serious: In November, 50 Indian product lines were removed from the GSP.

Normally, Indian negotiators would point out that Indo-U.S. trade isn’t particularly unbalanced, that we’re still a developing country and should get a few concessions, and that we’re all in this together against China, aren’t we?

That argument rings increasingly hollow, however. It isn’t just Trump’s fixation on Harley-Davidson motorcycles: He famously complained that Harleys imported into India were subject to a 50 percent tariff, even after Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi called the U.S. president personally to tell him tariffs were being cut. “They think they’re doing us a favor,” Trump fumed. “That’s not a favor.”

More genuine is concern about India’s growing protectionism. Indian tariffs on solar panels (ironically, meant to control Chinese imports) prompted a U.S. complaint at the World Trade Organization. Then, an Indian attempt to fix the price of stents caused the U.S. medical equipment industry to rise up in protest.

Now, India has chosen to wage battle against U.S. companies on a completely new front: data localization. The Reserve Bank of India told all payments companies to “store the entire data related to payments systems” solely in India. The government followed up with two separate draft policies, one of which ordered e-commerce companies to store user data in India and one which tells all internet companies to store personal data of Indians in India. The latter policy doesn’t even pretend to be anything other than an attempt to make it easier for Indian companies to do business at the expense of foreign ones. And, incidentally, it’s terrible news for any Indian who doesn’t want all her data made available to an unaccountable and intrusive national security bureaucracy.

E-commerce has also been a major flashpoint. The government is going after foreign-owned e-commerce web sites such as Amazon (NASDAQ:), telling them that they can’t hold any inventory or allow their platform to be used by companies they’d invested in. In other words, Amazon needs to find a middleman to sell Kindles or Echos on its Indian website. Local companies face no such restrictions.

The U.S. can certainly be faulted for not seeing the bigger picture. It’s China that’s distorting the global playing field, and U.S. trade policy should be focused on finding and building alliances with countries such as India to combat that larger problem. India has the potential to be a giant market, which U.S. companies might need if they’re slowly squeezed out of China.

But, India’s negotiators, too, should recognize two basic facts. First: The world isn’t going to take its rising protectionism lying down. If the country starts closing off its market, which right now remains more potential than reality, it will find doors closing to its exports as well. That in turn would reduce its attractiveness as a manufacturing base.

This leads us to the second fact, which is that India can’t manage without preferential trade deals. A quarter of the GSP goes to benefiting India, about $5.6 billion. This allows a lot of smaller, labor-intensive — and otherwise uncompetitive — Indian exporters access to the vast and lucrative U.S. market.

Not only can’t India afford to lose that, we need more such deals. Indian exports have largely remained flat, or even declined in real terms, since Modi took office. They were $314 billion in 2013-14 and are about $300 billion now. Protecting big business in India needs to take a back seat to the very real crisis facing Indian exports.



Yuan Little Changed After Positive January Trade Data By Investing.com


© Reuters.

Investing.com – The Chinese yuan was little changed on Thursday in Asia even after custom data showed a better-than-expected trade numbers in January, as analysts warned the presence of business distortions due to national holidays and cyclical trends.

The pair last traded at 6.7615 by 12:01 AM ET (05:01 GMT), up 0.04%.

January unexpectedly grew 9.1% from a year earlier, beating the expectation of a 3.2% drop, data from China’s General Administration of Customs showed on Thursday.

also only fell 1.5%, much less than the expected 10% fall and narrowing from December’s 7.6% drop.

That left the country with a of $39.16 billion for the month, better than forecasts of $33.5 billion.

The data seemed to have little impact on Chinese stocks and the yuan today. Some analysts cautioned that data published in the first months of the year must be treated with caution, as they generally looked better due to seasonal factors and business distortions caused by the long Lunar New Year holidays.

Looking ahead, investors will likely focus on the outcome of the latest round of trade negotiations with the U.S., which is scheduled to conclude on Friday in Beijing.

Meanwhile, the that tracks the greenback against a basket of other currencies slipped 0.1% to 96.893.

The Labor Department said on Thursday its was flat for January, after edging up 0.1% in the prior month. But core CPI, which excludes food and energy, rose 2.2% for the year through January, above forecasts for a 2.1% increase.

Elsewhere, the was up 0.5% against the U.S. dollar, having gained about 0.5% in the previous session on optimism about the China-U.S. trade talks.

The pair extended its rally and gained 0.6% after the Reserve Bank of New Zealand adopted a less dovish line on policy on Wednesday.

The pair was up 0.1%.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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Asian Equities Mixed Ahead of China Trade Data; Trade Talks in Focus By Investing.com


© Reuters.

Investing.com – Asian stocks were mixed in morning trade on Thursday as traders await China trade data and the outcome of the latest Sino-U.S. trade negotiations.

The was trading near flat while the edged up 0.1% by 9:30 PM ET (02:30 GMT). Hong Kong’s was down 0.6%.

Investor sentiment improved somewhat after U.S. President Donald Trump said trade talks are making good progress. “I think it’s going along very well,” Trump told reporters. “They’re showing us tremendous respect.”

In a surprise move, Trump said on Wednesday that he is open to extending the March 1 deadline for a tariff increase, if China and the U.S. get closer to a trade agreement, though there’s little signal so far that an accord is near.

His comments contrasted with earlier comments from the White House that described March 1 as a “hard deadline.”

Chinese President Xi Jinping is scheduled to meet US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin in Beijing on Friday, the South China Morning Post reported, citing unidentified people.

“Investors are once again cautiously optimistic that progress will be made and realistically an extension of the tariff deadline will be seen as a good result,” said Nick Twidale, chief operating officer at Rakuten Securities, in a Reuters report.

“Longer term, the only evidence of a solid deal going forward will dispel the investor caution and global growth fears that have been such a feature over the last year,” Twidale added.

Meanwhile, Japan’s traded 0.1% higher after government data showed earlier in the day that the country’s grew at an annualised rate of 1.4% in the October to December period last year.

The 1.4% expansion is in line with analysts’ expectation and followed a revised 2.6% annualised contraction in the July-September period.

The data also showed real exports rose 0.9% in October-December from the previous quarter, which was the fastest gain in a year.

Elsewhere, South Korea’s dropped 0.4%, while Australia edged up 0.1%.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



China Announces Better-Than-Expected January Trade Data Despite U.S. Trade War By Investing.com


© Reuters.

Investing.com – China’s trade data in January came in better than expected as front-loading ahead of the Lunar New Year boosted sales, custom data showed on Thursday.

January unexpectedly grew 9.1% from a year earlier, beating the expectation of a 3.2% drop, data from China’s General Administration of Customs showed.

also only fell 1.5%, much less than the expected 10% fall and narrowing from December’s 7.6% drop.

That left the country with a of $39.16 billion for the month, better than forecasts of $33.5 billion.

Analysts said the positive data was likely due to seasonal factors and business distortions caused by the long Lunar New Year holidays, which began on February 5 compared to February 15 in 2018. Data in the first two months of the year must be treated with caution, analysts warned.

Mixo Das, Asia equity strategist at J.P. Morgan, told CNBC that he would not read too much into the trade data released today due to the presence of distortions like the national holidays, cyclical trends and ongoing structural changes.

Das told CNBC he still expected China’s economy to bottom in the first half of the year.

Data today also showed China’s trade surplus with the United States narrowed to $27.3 billion in January, from $29.87 billion in December.

That better-than-expected data point came as Chinese and U.S. officials held their latest round of trade negotiations in Beijing this week. Citing unnamed sources, the South China Morning Posts reported that Chinese President Xi Jinping will meet with U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer on Friday.

The two sides are trying to reach an agreement before March 1. Trump has previously warned he might double the rate of tariffs on about $200 billions of Chinese goods if the deadline passes without a deal.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



U.S.-China trade talks move to higher level as deadline looms


BEIJING (Reuters) – U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said he was looking forward to trade talks with China on Thursday, as discussions in Beijing moved to a higher level in a push to de-escalate a tariff war ahead of a March 1 deadline for a deal.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, a member of the U.S. trade delegation to China, leaves a hotel in Beijing for talks with Chinese officials, China, February 14, 2019. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

The talks, scheduled to run through Friday, follow three days of deputy-level meetings to work out technical details, including a mechanism for enforcing any trade agreement.

“Looking forward to discussions today,” Mnuchin told reporters without elaborating as he left his hotel.

He and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer opened the meetings shortly afterward at the Diaoyutai state guest house with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, the top economic adviser to Chinese President Xi Jinping.

U.S. tariffs on $200 billion worth of imports from China are scheduled to rise to 25 percent from 10 percent if the two sides don’t reach a deal by the deadline, increasing pressure and costs in sectors from consumer electronics to agriculture.

U.S. President Donald Trump told reporters on Wednesday that the negotiations had been progressing “very well”.

Trump’s advisors have described March 1 as a “hard deadline”, and the president has said a delay was possible though he preferred not to do so. But, a Bloomberg report on Thursday cited sources saying he was considering pushing back the deadline by 60 days to give negotiators more time.

Trump has said he did not expect to meet with Xi prior to March 1, but White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders has raised the possibility of a meeting between the leaders at the president’s personal retreat at Mar-a-Lago in Florida.

U.S. Department of Agriculture Deputy Secretary Stephen Censky said on Wednesday that the two presidents were expected to meet “sometime in March,” but no dates were set.

The Chinese government has offered few details about the state of negotiations this week.

Chinese trade data released on Thursday showed imports from the United States fell 41.2 percent from a year earlier to $9.24 billion, the lowest amount in dollar terms since February 2016.

Exports to the United States also declined 2.4 percent to $36.54 billion, the lowest amount since April 2018.

China’s trade surplus with the United States narrowed to $27.3 billion in January, from $29.87 billion in December.

China’s soybean imports fell 13 percent in January from a year earlier, customs data showed, as a hefty duty on shipments from the United States, its second largest supplier, curbed purchases.

The United States has used tariffs as leverage to demand Beijing make major structural policy changes, including ending the forced transfer of American technology, fully enforcing intellectual property rights, and curbing industrial subsidies.

But China has denied accusations of trade abuses. While Chinese officials have repeatedly pledged to improve market access for foreign investors, few experts expect Beijing to agree to anything that would force fundamental changes to what Washington complains is its state-led approach to trade.

China’s nationalist state-run Global Times tabloid said in an editorial late on Wednesday that though Washington had started the trade fight, it “was now more willing to reach an agreement”.

“China will never harm its fundamental interests. The policy has been tested by the trade war and we have seen the change in Washington’s attitude,” the paper said.

Reporting by Michael Martina; Editing by Shri Navaratnam & Simon Cameron-Moore



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China January trade surplus with U.S. narrows to $27.3 billion By Reuters


© Reuters. Shipping containers are seen at a port in Lianyungang

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s trade surplus with the United States narrowed to $27.3 billion in January, from $29.87 billion in December, customs data showed on Thursday.

China’s exports to the United States fell 2.4 percent in January from a year earlier, while imports from the United States plunged 41.2 percent.

China’s large trade surplus with the United States has long been a sore point with Washington, and is at the centre of a bitter dispute between the world’s two biggest economies.

The two countries have hit each other with tit-for-tariffs on goods worth hundreds of billions of dollars.

A new round of Sino-U.S. trade talks began in Beijing on Monday as the two sides’ renewed efforts to hammer out a deal ahead of a March 1 deadline when U.S. tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports are scheduled to increase to 25 percent from 10 percent.        

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



Mnuchin says ‘looking forward’ to China trade talks as deadline looms By Reuters


© Reuters. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, a member of the U.S. trade delegation to China, leaves a hotel in Beijing for talks with Chinese officials

BEIJING (Reuters) – U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Thursday he was “looking forward” to trade talks with China, as the two sides began high-level discussions in Beijing aimed at resolving a tariff war ahead of a March 1 deadline for a deal.

The talks, scheduled to run through Friday, follow three days of deputy-level meetings to work out technical details, including a mechanism for enforcing any trade agreement.

“Looking forward to discussions today,” Mnuchin told reporters without elaborating as he left his hotel.

He and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer opened the meetings shortly afterward at the Diaoyutai state guest house with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, the top economic adviser to Chinese President Xi Jinping.

U.S. tariffs on $200 billion worth of imports from China are scheduled to rise to 25 percent from 10 percent if the two sides don’t reach a deal by the deadline, increasing pressure and costs in sectors from consumer electronics to agriculture.

While advisers to U.S. President Donald Trump have described March 1 as a “hard deadline”, the president has said a delay was possible though he preferred not to do so. He told reporters on Wednesday that the negotiations had been progressing “very well”.

Trump has said he did not expect to meet with Xi prior to March 1, but White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders has raised the possibility of a meeting between the leaders at the president’s personal retreat at Mar-a-Lago in Florida.

U.S. Department of Agriculture Deputy Secretary Stephen Censky said on Wednesday that the two presidents were expected to meet “sometime in March,” but no dates were set.

The Chinese government has offered few details about the state of negotiations this week.

The United States has used tariffs as leverage to demand Beijing make major structural policy changes, including ending the forced transfer of American trade secrets, fully enforcing intellectual property rights, and curbing industrial subsidies.

But China has denied accusations of trade abuses. While Chinese officials have repeatedly pledged to improve market access for foreign investors, few experts expect Beijing to agree to anything that would force fundamental changes to what Washington complains is its state-led approach to trade.

China’s nationalist state-run Global Times tabloid said in an editorial late on Wednesday that though Washington had started the trade fight, it “was now more willing to reach an agreement”.

“China will never harm its fundamental interests. The policy has been tested by the trade war and we have seen the change in Washington’s attitude,” the paper said.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



U.S.’ Mnuchin says ‘looking forward’ to China trade talks


U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, a member of the U.S. trade delegation to China, leaves a hotel in Beijing for talks with Chinese officials, China, February 14, 2019. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

BEIJING (Reuters) – U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Thursday he was “looking forward” to trade talks with China as the two countries were set to begin formal high-level discussions in Beijing.

“Looking forward to discussions today,” Mnuchin told reporters as he left his hotel. He did not elaborate.

Reporting by Michael Martina; Writing by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Paul Tait



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Trump: China trade talks going ‘very well’ before high-level parley


WASHINGTON/BEIJING (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday trade talks with China were “going along very well” as the world’s two largest economies try to resolve their seven-month tariff war ahead of a March 1 deadline for a deal.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross during a Cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 12, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo

U.S. tariffs on $200 billion worth of imports from China are scheduled to rise to 25 percent from 10 percent if the two sides don’t reach a deal by then, increasing pain and costs in sectors from consumer electronics to agriculture.

Trump told reporters at the White House his administration has a “big team of people, very talented people, over in China right now, negotiating on the China deal.”

“It’s going along very well. We’ll see what happens, but I think it’s going along very well. They’re showing us tremendous respect,” Trump added.

Trump’s comments echoed those of U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who earlier told reporters in Beijing: “So far, so good,” when asked about the progress of talks.

Mnuchin, along with U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer, arrived in the Chinese capital on Tuesday for meetings with Vice Premier Liu He, the top economic adviser to Chinese President Xi Jinping, on Thursday and Friday. Deputy-level officials started talks on Monday.

The two U.S. cabinet officials will meet with Xi on Friday, the South China Morning Post reported, citing a source briefed on the arrangements. Representatives from the USTR’s office and Treasury could not immediately be reached to comment on the report.

Trump met with Liu at the White House when a Chinese delegation came to Washington for talks at the end of January.

The U.S. president had said on Tuesday that the deadline for an agreement could “slide for a little while,” but he preferred not to do so. Trump added he expects to meet with Xi to close the deal at some point.

Trump’s advisers have described March 1 as a “hard deadline,” but Trump told reporters a delay was possible.

Speaking to Fox News on Wednesday, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said: “we’ll see what happens on whether or not the president makes a move to change the deadline.”

She also raised the possibility of a meeting between the leaders of the two countries, saying Trump’s personal retreat at Mar-a-Lago in Florida would make a good venue.

“It will ultimately take … President Trump and President Xi sitting down face-to-face figuring that out and getting that final deal because they are the only two that’ll ultimately be able to nail that down,” Sanders said.

Trump has said he did not expect to meet with Xi prior to March 1.

TALKS KICKED OFF MONDAY

U.S. Department of Agriculture Deputy Secretary Stephen Censky said on Wednesday the two presidents were expected to meet “sometime in March,” but no dates were set.

“Hopefully they are going to be meeting and will be able conclude a deal,” Censky told a renewable fuels conference in Orlando, Florida. “Agriculture has to be part of it. It’s a necessary part of the deal.”

A growing number of U.S. businesses and lawmakers hope the tariff increase is delayed while the two sides tackle the difficult U.S. demands for major structural policy changes by China. They include ending the forced transfer of American trade secrets, curbing Beijing’s industrial subsidies and enforcing intellectual property rights.

The latest round of talks in Beijing kicked off on Monday at the deputy level to work out technical details, including a mechanism for enforcing any trade agreement.

China’s Foreign Ministry referred questions on the talks to the Ministry of Commerce, which did not respond to a request for comment.

Slideshow (6 Images)

James Green, a senior research fellow at Georgetown University, believes China is seeking a Xi-Trump meeting, hoping it would make a near-term deal on tariffs far more likely.

“From their point of view, they would have dodged a bullet,” Green, who was USTR’s top official at the U.S. embassy in Beijing until mid-2018, told Reuters.

Reporting by Philip Wen, Ben Blanchard and Michael Martina in Beijing; Robarta Rampton, David Lawder, Susan Heavey and Lisa Lambert in Washington; Chris Prentice and Jarrett Renshaw in New York; Editing by Clarence Fernandez, Nick Macfie and Jeffrey Benkoe



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Oil prices edge up on hopes for U.S.-China trade breakthrough By Reuters


© Reuters. An oil well pump jack is seen at an oil field supply yard near Denver

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Oil prices inched up on Thursday, buoyed by hopes that potential progress in the latest Sino-U.S. tariff talks would improve the global economic outlook.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $53.76 per barrel at 2338 GMT, up 10 cents, or 0.2 percent, from their last settlement. They closed up 1.5 percent on Wednesday, having touched their highest since Feb. 5 at $54.60 a barrel.

International futures had yet to trade. They closed the previous session up 1.9 percent, after marking their strongest since Nov. 21 at $63.98 a barrel.

Optimism that a trade deal could be reached between the United States and China was boosted when U.S. President Donald Trump said talks were going “very well”.

“The 90-day truce (on trade) agreed in December will run out on March 1, but given the progress of the talks there could be an extension, which is why there are rising optimism that the two leaders will meet later that month,” said Alfonso Esparza, senior market analyst, OANDA.

But climbing U.S. oil stockpiles weighed on prices. oil inventories rose last week to the highest since November 2017 as refiners cut runs to the lowest since October 2017, the Energy Information Administration said on Wednesday.

Crude inventories built for a fourth week in a row, rising 3.6 million barrels to 450.8 million barrels in the week to Feb. 8. Analysts polled by Reuters forecast an increase of 2.7 million barrels.

The global oil market will struggle this year to absorb fast-growing crude supply from outside the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, even with the group’s production cuts and U.S. sanctions on Venezuela and Iran, the International Energy Agency said in a report on Wednesday.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.