Some Disneyland workers protest reopening plans amid pandemic By Reuters


12/12

© Reuters. Disney cast members stage a car caravan outside Disneyland California, calling for higher safety standards for Disneyland to reopen

2/12

ANAHEIM, Calif. (Reuters) – Workers at California’s Disneyland Resort protested from their cars on Saturday, arguing that the Walt Disney Co (N:) has not agreed to adequate protections for employees when the destination reopens to the public amid a pandemic.

The company had planned to welcome guests back to Disneyland and neighboring California Adventure starting July 17 but delayed the restart date indefinitely.

Disney said this week that it would set a new opening date after the state issues guidelines on how theme parks can return to business safely amid the global coronavirus outbreak.

On Saturday, about 200 cars formed a caravan outside the resort in the protest staged by the Coalition of Resort Labor Unions, a group of 11 unions that represent 17,000 Disneyland workers.

The unions have called on the company to commit to providing onsite testing for COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

“When Disney does reopen, we want it to be as safe as possible for cast members, for the guests, and for the families that cast members have to go back to,” said Maria Hernandez, a union member who attended the rally.

Disney said in a Saturday statement that it has reached agreements on coronavirus protections with 20 union affiliates that include additional sick pay, face coverings for guests and cast members, and reduced park capacity.

In a letter to unions earlier this week, a Disney representative said existing COVID-19 testing was not recommended by U.S. health authorities for routine screening.

Instead, health officials recommend focusing on physical distancing, face coverings, hand washing and sanitization, the letter said.

Disney began shutting its theme parks in January as the coronavirus spread. It has reopened parks in Shanghai and Hong Kong to a limited number of guests. The company plans to open Walt Disney World in Florida on July 11.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



Exclusive: U.S., Brazil protest Thailand’s pesticide ban over impact on wheat, soy exports



© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Workers spray insecticide at a maize field destroyed by Fall Army Worm at Pak Chong district in Thailand

By Patpicha Tanakasempipat

BANGKOK (Reuters) – The United States and Brazil lodged separate protests with Thailand over its ban on two farm chemicals earlier this month, documents reviewed by Reuters show, saying the “restrictive” and “serious” move could hurt key agricultural exports.

Bangkok’s pesticide ban could hit U.S. and Brazilian exports of wheat and soy that are worth more than $1 billion a year, according to United Nations data, potentially setting up a diplomatic showdown with Thailand, a leading importer of the commodities from both countries.

The knock-on effect on Thailand’s food chain could also add tens of billions of dollars to costs while slashing millions of jobs, according to one Thai industry estimate.

Thailand added weedkiller paraquat and insecticide chlorpyrifos to its list of most hazardous substances on June 1, citing a need to protect human health. The move triggered another health regulation banning imported food products containing residues of prohibited chemicals.

The import ban has been drafted pending comments from interested parties up to July 18 and will become law once published in Thailand’s Royal Gazette. There is no apparent legal mechanism to derail the ban without first amending Thai health law.

The United States and Brazil challenged Thailand’s move in separate letters in late May after Thailand informed the World Trade Organization (WTO) of the pending import ban. Both the United States and Brazil suggested the Southeast Asian country lacked new scientific evidence, as required by the WTO Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS), to justify a measure that could restrict international trade.

“We have general concerns regarding the notified actions which appear to be more trade-restrictive than necessary,” Russ Nicely, Agricultural Counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok, wrote in a letter reviewed by Reuters.

Thailand imports nearly all of its soybeans from the United States and Brazil. In 2019, Thailand was the world’s eighth and fourth largest importer of U.S. and Brazilian soybeans, worth $525 million and $602 million, respectively, according to the United Nations Comtrade database.

Thailand, also the 10th largest market for U.S. wheat, uses millions of tonnes of both crops each year to produce a range of products from cooking oil, noodles, to animal feed.

The U.S. and Brazilian embassies in Thailand did not immediately comment.

BAN ‘DISREGARDS RISK ANALYSES’

Mananya Thaiset, a Thai deputy agriculture minister who championed Bangkok’s ban, has said the rationale is to protect human health at all costs. Mananya’s office declined to comment to Reuters for this story.

Paraquat, which has been linked to Parkinson’s Disease in various research, is banned in the European Union and China, while Brazil itself is also prohibiting its use later this year. Several studies have also linked chlorpyrifos, banned in Europe and U.S. state California, to impaired brain development in children.

But Brazil and the United States both urged Thailand to continue allowing imports of goods under Maximum Residue Limits (MRL) according to Codex, the international standards used for acceptable residue levels in traded food commodities.

Many countries that ban paraquat or chlorpyrifos domestically still allow imported foods under MRL standards.

“The Thai authority’s approach disregards risk analyses in the setting of regulatory measures that may have serious impact on trade,” said Brazil’s agriculture ministry, in a letter reviewed by Reuters defending the use of insecticide chlorpyrifos.

The latest tensions on farm chemicals come in the wake of a spat last year when the United States protested Thailand’s plan to ban glyphosate, used in Bayer AG (DE:)’s contentious weedkiller Roundup, the subject of many U.S. lawsuits claiming it causes cancer.

Thailand later backed down on glyphosate, but proceeded to ban the other two pesticides.

‘WE CAN’T CONTINUE’

Thailand would be one of few major markets for agricultural goods to impose zero tolerance on imports of commodities containing residues.

About 10 million Thai farming households are already facing up to the impact of the ban, especially on paraquat.

“Other chemicals are expensive and do far more damage to main crops than paraquat, while killing weed with less efficiency,” said Sarawut Rungmekarat, an agronomist at Kasetsart University in Bangkok.

Thai agribusinesses also argue the import ban would create ripple effects that disrupts the domestic food chain, from animal feed to livestock, fishery, food industries.

The import ban would cost Thai companies 1.7 trillion baht ($55 billion) and 12 million jobs, said the country’s Joint Standing Committee on Commerce, Industry and Banking, which urged Thailand’s prime minister to introduce a grace period until end-2021.

Thailand’s animal feed industry relies almost entirely on importing 5 million tonnes of soybean and 1 million tonnes of wheat per year.

“If you cut our supplies today, we simply can’t continue,” Pornsil Patchrintanakul, president of the Thai Feed Mill Association, told Reuters.

“If we fall, everyone falls with us.”



Global equities cruise to three-month highs, dollar under protest pressure


NEW YORK (Reuters) – World stock markets hit their highest levels since March and oil prices jumped on Tuesday as signs of a global economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic offset concerns over the worst civil unrest in the United States in decades.

FILE PHOTO – The German share price index DAX graph is pictured at the stock exchange in Frankfurt, Germany, May 5, 2020. REUTERS/Staff

Despite those gains, investors were hesitant to move away from the perceived safety of government bonds, which edged lower but remained near record highs.

“In a way, it is remarkable that the market remains in this positive mood,” said Elwin de Groot, head of macro strategy at Rabobank. “Even with these rising protests in the U.S. and the situation in Hong Kong at the moment, the market is pushing on and seeing room for optimism.”

MSCI’s gauge of stocks across the globe gained 0.72% following broad advances in Europe and Asia. The index remains down about 8.5% for the year to date.

In morning trading on Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 142.61 points, or 0.56%, to 25,617.63, the S&P 500 gained 10.38 points, or 0.34%, to 3,066.11 and the Nasdaq Composite added 7.15 points, or 0.07%, to 9,559.20.

The tech-heavy Nasdaq is now only 3% from its pre-pandemic record highs. [.N]

May Purchasing Managers Index data pointed to a fragile but encouraging recovery in global manufacturing, raising hopes that the worst is over, while reports that Germany was considering a stimulus plan to boost car sales lifted European stocks.

Japan’s Nikkei rose 1.2% to its highest since late February and markets in Seoul, Taipei, Hong Kong and China [.SS] also gained as the Chinese central bank there provided another shot of stimulus.

Bond investors remained more cautious that the global economy had fully turned a corner. Benchmark 10-year notes last fell 4/32 in price to yield 0.6738%, from 0.662% late on Monday.

“This optimistic read for risk can only persist if measures like orders and employment continue to improve month to month,” said Alan Ruskin, chief international strategist at Deutsche Bank.

“Early setbacks would be a very poor sign, but are not expected in the period immediately following the end of lockdowns.”

The dollar was at multi-month lows against most major currencies following a 5% drop for its main index since March. [FRX/]

“The protests are part of the reason for the sell-off in the dollar over the last four or five days,” said CMC Markets senior analyst Michael Hewson.

Some U.S. demonstrators, angered over the recent death of the unarmed African American, George Floyd, while in police custody, had set fire to a mall in Los Angeles overnight, looted stores in New York, and at least five U.S. police had been hit by gunfire in separate incidents.

Hopes for rising demand from an economic rebound boosted oil prices. U.S. crude recently rose 1.35% to $35.92 per barrel and Brent was at $38.70, up 0.99% on the day.

Reporting by David Randall; Editing by Bernadette Baum



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French Amazon workers protest in coronavirus pushback


SARAN, France/PARIS (Reuters) – Several hundred Amazon (AMZN.O) workers in France protested at one of its sites on Wednesday, calling on the online retailer to cease operations or make it easier for employees loath to work during the coronavirus outbreak to stay away.

FILE PHOTO: The logo of Amazon is seen at the company logistics centre in Boves, France, November 5, 2019. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Retailers across France were ordered to shut over the past weekend as the country stepped up measures to try and control the spread of the disease, with only stores providing foods and other basic goods or services allowed to operate.

Online deliveries are still permitted, however.

At an Amazon warehouse and shipping center at Saran just outside Orleans, a city south of Paris, some 250-300 workers staged a strike, gathering outside the site and calling for its closure. It normally employs some 1,800 full-time staff.

Unions representing employees there and in other Amazon hubs in France said some workers were unwilling to potentially expose themselves to the coronavirus.

“Fewer than 1% of our stocks are groceries, so we’re far from being indispensable for the country to keep going,” said Julien Vincent, who represents Amazon logistics workers for France’s CFDT. “As far as we’re concerned, either everyone has to close, or no one does – you can’t have half-measures.”

Vincent estimated that 30%-40% of Amazon employees in France had now dropped out of work for fear of coronavirus contagion or because they had to keep children at home after French schools closed. The company had called on temporary workers to make up for any shortages, he added.

Amazon had also offered to negotiate salary increases for those who stayed on, he said.

Amazon did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Several hundred people at Amazon have now exercised a French right to stop work while still receiving full pay, according to Vincent and another union official.

Protestors at the Saran site were also demonstrating to be allowed to apply this rule, an official at the CGT union there said, saying that employees had been told by Amazon managers that it might be contested.

With shopping in stores now banned, demand for Amazon deliveries is surging, particularly for household staples and medical supplies, the U.S. company told its sellers on Tuesday.

Amazon said it would take in only essential supplies at its U.S. and UK and other European warehouses until April 5, to free up inventory space for these products. They include baby products, beauty and personal care items, pet supplies, books and industrial and scientific goods.

Amazon will not stop selling non-essential items like phone cases and toys, but those products may be more likely to run out of stock in the next few weeks as a result.

Additional reporting and writing by Sarah White; Editing by Mark Heinrich



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You’re stealing our water: Germans protest against Tesla gigafactory


BERLIN (Reuters) – Around 250 Germans on Saturday protested in the outskirts of Berlin where electric car startup Tesla is planning to build a gigafactory, saying its construction will endanger water supply and wildlife in the area.

Demonstrators hold anti-Tesla posters during a protest against plans by U.S. electric vehicle pioneer Tesla to build its first European factory and design center in Gruenheide near Berlin, Germany January 18, 2020. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski

The U.S. carmaker announced plans last November to build its first European car factory in Gruenheide, in the eastern state of Brandenburg.

Politicians, unions and industry groups have welcomed the move, saying it will bring jobs to the region, but environmental concerns drove hundreds of locals to the streets on Saturday.

“We are here, we are loud, because Tesla is stealing our water,” protesters called.

Saturday’s protest came after a Brandenburg water association on Thursday warned against “extensive and serious problems with the drinking water supply and wastewater disposal” for the proposed factory.

Anne Bach, a 27-year-old environmental activist, said Tesla’s plans published earlier this month showed it would need more than 300 cubic meters of water per hour which would drain the area’s declining reserves.

“I am not against Tesla … But it’s about the site; in a forest area that is a protected wildlife zone. Is this necessary?” Bach said.

“In such an ecological system like the one here and with the background that climate is changing, I cannot understand why another location was not selected from the beginning,” said Frank Gersdorf, a member of “Citizens’ Initiative Gruenheide against Gigafactory”, a local group that organized Saturday’s protest.

Environmentalist protests in Germany have previously halted and delayed major companies’ plans such RWE’s lignite mining at the Hambach forest, near Cologne, which has become a symbol of the anti-coal protests.

Saturday’s protest, which Gersdorf and Bach said developed spontaneously from a 50-people forest walk demonstration, highlighted the deforestation of around 300 hectares to build the factory and its impact on wildlife, including birds, insects and bats.

People were also protesting against an expected “enormous” increase in traffic on a nearby highway and through the villages.

Next to the protest, on the other side of the street, around 20 people carried banners welcoming Tesla in their village, with children chanting, “We are here, we are loud, because Tesla is building our future.”

Bernd Kutz, a Gruenheide local, said Tesla would bring improvement to the area, create jobs and give chances to young people.

“I am here because I don’t understand those demonstrators who shout and show us the finger,” Kutz said. “Why has it always to be negative?”

Reporting by Riham Alkousaa; editing by Christina Fincher



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Germans protest against Tesla gigafactory By Reuters



By Riham Alkousaa

BERLIN (Reuters) – Around 250 Germans on Saturday protested in the outskirts of Berlin where electric car startup Tesla (NASDAQ:) is planning to build a gigafactory, saying its construction will endanger water supply and wildlife in the area.

The U.S. carmaker announced plans last November to build its first European car factory in Gruenheide, in the eastern state of Brandenburg.

Politicians, unions and industry groups have welcomed the move, saying it will bring jobs to the region, but environmental concerns drove hundreds of locals to the streets on Saturday.

“We are here, we are loud, because Tesla is stealing our water,” protesters called.

Saturday’s protest came after a Brandenburg water association on Thursday warned against “extensive and serious problems with the drinking water supply and wastewater disposal” for the proposed factory.

Anne Bach, a 27-year-old environmental activist, said Tesla’s plans published earlier this month showed it would need more than 300 cubic meters of water per hour which would drain the area’s declining reserves.

“I am not against Tesla … But it’s about the site; in a forest area that is a protected wildlife zone. Is this necessary?” Bach said.

“In such an ecological system like the one here and with the background that climate is changing, I cannot understand why another location was not selected from the beginning,” said Frank Gersdorf, a member of “Citizens’ Initiative Gruenheide against Gigafactory”, a local group that organized Saturday’s protest.

Environmentalist protests in Germany have previously halted and delayed major companies’ plans such RWE’s lignite mining at the Hambach forest, near Cologne, which has become a symbol of the anti-coal protests.

Saturday’s protest, which Gersdorf and Bach said developed spontaneously from a 50-people forest walk demonstration, highlighted the deforestation of around 300 hectares to build the factory and its impact on wildlife, including birds, insects and bats.

People were also protesting against an expected “enormous” increase in traffic on a nearby highway and through the villages.

Next to the protest, on the other side of the street, around 20 people carried banners welcoming Tesla in their village, with children chanting, “We are here, we are loud, because Tesla is building our future.”

Bernd Kutz, a Gruenheide local, said Tesla would bring improvement to the area, create jobs and give chances to young people.

“I am here because I don’t understand those demonstrators who shout and show us the finger,” Kutz said. “Why has it always to be negative?”

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



Yen rises, yuan falls after Trump signs Hong Kong protest bill By Reuters



By Stanley White

TOKYO (Reuters) – The safe-haven yen rose against the dollar after U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law legislation supporting anti-government protesters in Hong Kong, which could complicate efforts to end the U.S.-China trade war.

The yuan fell in offshore trade as scrutiny of Hong Kong’s response to months of often violent protest against Chinese rule of the former British colony potentially opens up a new fault line in already fractious relations between Washington and Beijing.

The Swiss franc and gold also rose on Thursday as investors sought safe-haven assets due to concern about a potential increase in geopolitical risk.

The focus now shifts to China’s reaction as investors try to gauge how much impact U.S. support of anti-government protests in Hong Kong will have on negotiations to scale back a 16-month long trade war between the world’s two-largest economies.

“The yen is being bought because of the news about Trump signing the Hong Kong bill,” said Yukio Ishizuki, foreign exchange strategist at Daiwa Securities in Tokyo.

“Algorithmic trading could push the yen up further, but the dollar’s losses will be limited because we’ve had positive U.S. economic data, which has lifted sentiment.”

The yen rose around 0.2% to 109.35 versus the dollar on Thursday in Asia, rebounding from a six-month low reached Wednesday after U.S. economic growth was revised up in the third quarter.

In the offshore market, the yuan fell 0.19% to 7.0290 per dollar.

Trump on Wednesday signed a bill that requires the State Department to certify, at least annually, that Hong Kong retains enough autonomy to justify favorable U.S. trading terms which have helped it maintain its position as a global financial hub.

The law also threatens sanctions for human rights violations in Hong Kong, which has been rocked by months of civil unrest in response to what protesters say is an erosion of freedoms since reverting to Chinese rule in 1997.

Beijing has denied any undue influence and has blamed foreign governments for meddling it Hong Kong’s affairs.

Many see the U.S. legislation as symbolic, but it has the potential, if implemented, to upend relations between the United States and Hong Kong and change the territory’s status to that of any other Chinese city.

The U.S. rebuke comes at a sensitive time because U.S. and Chinese negotiators are trying to reach an agreement to de-escalate a trade war, which would remove a huge headwind from the global economic outlook.

Washington and Beijing have imposed tariffs on each other’s goods in a prolonged dispute over Chinese trade practices that the U.S. government says is unfair.

Investor uncertainty benefited the Swiss franc , which pulled back from a two-month low to trade at 0.99875 against the greenback.

Gold , another safe haven bought in times of uncertainty, rose 0.13% to $1,456.15 per ounce.

The rise in safe havens undermined the dollar, which came into Asian trade on a high after revised data showed U.S. economic growth picked up slightly in the third quarter.

Separate data showed new orders for key U.S.-made capitalgoods increased by the most in nine months in October and shipments rebounded.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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Iran’s Revolutionary Guards arrest about 100 protest leaders: Iranian judiciary By Reuters


Iran’s Revolutionary Guards arrest about 100 protest leaders: Iranian judiciary

GENEVA (Reuters) – Iran’s Revolutionary Guards have arrested about 100 leaders of the protests that erupted last week over gasoline price rises, Gholamhossein Esmaili, spokesman for Iran’s judiciary, said on Friday according to the official IRNA news agency.

“Approximately 100 leaders, heads and main figures of the recent unrest were identified and arrested in various parts of the country by the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps,” Esmaili said.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



Russian police detain prominent opposition activist before protest By Reuters


© Reuters. Rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma in Moscow

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russian police detained 89 people in central Moscow during an unauthorised opposition protest on Saturday, independent monitoring group OVD-info reported.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



Hong Kong’s Economy Starts to Feel the Hit from Protest Chaos By Bloomberg


© Reuters. Hong Kong’s Economy Starts to Feel the Hit from Protest Chaos

(Bloomberg) — Hong Kong is beginning to reckon with the economic cost of ongoing protests against the government’s extradition bill, as the disruption risks driving away local shoppers and deterring tourists from mainland China.

The Hong Kong Retail Management Association said Tuesday that “most members” reported a single-to-double-digit drop in average sales revenue between June and the first week of July, when multiple demonstrations converging on major office and retail districts took place.

The threat to Hong Kong’s vital retail sector will hit its economy at a time when it is already slowing. Retail sales data for June is due for release on August 1, with the value of goods sold having contracted every month since February.

The “industry is worried that these events will damage Hong Kong’s international image as a safe city, a culinary capital, and a shopping heaven,” the association said in a statement.

Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s bid to ease extraditions to the mainland prompted hundreds of thousands of protesters to take to the streets in a wave of historic protests that has brought parts of the city to a halt since early last month.

Hong Kong Financial Secretary Paul Chan said at a briefing July 15 that second quarter economic output is expected to be “slow,” though there haven’t been obvious capital outflows amid the demonstrations.

Sales Drop

Sa Sa International Holdings Ltd., a seller of cosmetics, reported a 15.3% drop in same store sales in Hong Kong and Macau for the three months through June. The company said the demonstrations had affected some stores, as had a high comparison from the previous year.

For the same period, Chow Tai Fook Jewellery Group Ltd. reported an 11% decline. The political backdrop and a decline in mainland visitors increases the likelihood of a two percentage-point reduction in its first-half operating margin, Catherine Lim, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence in Singapore, wrote in a note.

These Brands Are Caught in the Middle of Hong Kong’s Protests

The chances of a marked economic impact from the protests raises comparisons with the Occupy movement that blocked parts of central Hong Kong five years ago. Economic growth slowed in the fourth quarter of 2014 from the previous period, and the government at the time partially blamed that weaker performance on the protest, saying it “affected tourism, hotel, catering, retail and transport industries.”

Carry On

This year, the number of visitors to the city from mainland China has been increasing strongly, thanks in part to the opening of a new bridge linking Hong Kong with the city of Zhuhai, in Guangdong province. Arrivals in May surged 23.6 percent from a year earlier, with the June tally not yet available.

Images of protesters blocking major city thoroughfares — and retail outlets — is likely to pose a significant risk if the demonstrations continue. On July 1, a gathering that ultimately saw protesters break into and vandalize the city’s legislative building hampered retailers in the shopping district of Causeway Bay and elsewhere.

Hong Kong Turmoil Has Wealthy Eyeing Havens Beyond China’s Grasp

Yet most businesses are attempting to carry on.

“There were so many people, it was a mess, no one wanted to come in,” said Chen Yan, 30, who works at the counter of a pharmaceutical store in Causeway Bay. “But we haven’t changed our operations because of the protests. We expect it to be temporary.”

(Updates association comment in second paragraph.)