Trump calls for World Bank to stop loaning to China By Reuters



WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump on Friday called for the World Bank to stop loaning money to China, one day after the institution adopted a lending plan to Beijing over Washington’s objections.

The World Bank on Thursday adopted a plan to aid China with $1 billion to $1.5 billion in low-interest loans annually through June 2025. The plan calls for lending to “gradually decline” from the previous five-year average of $1.8 billion.

“Why is the World Bank loaning money to China? Can this be possible? China has plenty of money, and if they don’t, they create it. STOP!” Trump wrote in a post on Twitter.

Spokespeople for the White House and the World Bank did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The World Bank loaned China $1.3 billion in the fiscal 2019 year, which ended on June 30, a decrease from around $2.4 billion in fiscal 2017.

But the fall in the World Bank’s loans to China is not swift enough for the Trump administration, which has argued that Beijing is too wealthy for international aid.

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‘Blockchain Is A Rapidly Maturing Technology in China’ By Cointelegraph


© Reuters. Report: ‘Blockchain Is A Rapidly Maturing Technology in China’

Forkast Insights, the research arm of Asia-based Forkast, took an in-depth, comprehensive look at how blockchain technology is integrated in China.

On Dec. 5, Forkast Insights presented its first report on how blockchain is being applied by the Chinese government and companies across the country. According to the report, blockchain technology is rapidly maturing and has a slew of “real-world, practical use cases that are far beyond the experimental stage.”

Continue Reading on Coin Telegraph

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Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



Trump will make final call on China tariffs, likes direction of talks: Kudlow By Reuters


© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Director of the National Economic Council Larry Kudlow speaks to the media at the White House in Washington

By Doina Chiacu and David Lawder

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Top White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said on Friday that a Dec. 15 deadline is still in place to impose a new round of U.S. tariffs on Chinese consumer goods, but President Donald Trump likes where trade talks with China are going.

With about a week to go before the deadline amid “intense” negotiations, Kudlow said Trump would make the final decision on the import tariffs, which would hit Chinese-made cellphones, laptop computers, toys and clothing.

“There’s no arbitrary deadline here … but that fact remains December 15 is a very important date with respect to a no-go or go-on tariffs,” Kudlow, the director of White House’s National Economic Council, told CNBC. “It’s going to be totally up to POTUS (the U.S. president). But December 15th is an important date.”

China earlier on Friday said it will waive import tariffs for some soybeans and pork shipments from the United States, contributing to a more positive tone in financial market sentiment about the talks.

Kudlow, speaking to reporters at the White House, described the waivers as “good mood music” for the negotiations between the world’s two largest economies.

Washington and Beijing are trying to reach agreement on a ‘phase one’ trade deal that would cool a 17-month trade war that has roiled financial markets, disrupted supply chains and weighed on global economic growth.

China has demanded that some of the existing U.S. tariffs imposed on about $375 billion worth of its exports be removed, in addition to cancellation of the Dec. 15 tariffs on some $156 billion of its remaining exports to the United States.

Trump has demanded that China commit to specific minimum purchases of U.S. agricultural products, among other concessions on intellectual property rights, currency and access to China’s financial services markets.

“We’ve all learned that if he is not satisfied with these talks … then he would not hesitate to increase tariffs,” Kudlow told Bloomberg Television.

Kudlow said the two sides have talked almost daily, but there are currently no plans for in-person talks or a signing ceremony between Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping.

“None of those decisions have been made … let’s get a deal first and then we’ll figure out how, when and where they’ll do the signing.”

Trump struck an upbeat tone on Thursday even after Chinese officials reiterated their stance that existing tariffs must come off as part of an interim deal to de-escalate the U.S.-China trade war.

Financial markets have been bouncing up and down for weeks on shifts in rhetoric about the trade negotiations. On Friday, the mood was positive, helped by a strong jobs report and the more positive tone from Trump.

At midday, the major U.S. stock indexes were all up around 1%, nearing the record highs they touched last week.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

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China to waive tariffs on some U.S. soybeans, pork in goodwill gesture By Reuters


© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Pork vendors at a market in Beijing

By Dominique Patton and Yawen Chen

BEIJING (Reuters) – In a positive gesture, China said on Friday that it will waive import tariffs for some soybeans and pork shipments from the United States, as the two sides try to thrash out a broader agreement to defuse their protracted trade war.

The tariff waivers were based on applications by individual firms for U.S. soybeans and pork imports, the finance ministry said in a statement, citing a decision by the country’s cabinet. It did not specify the quantities involved.

China had imposed the levies in response to tariffs launched by Washington over allegations that China steals and forces the transfer of American intellectual property to Chinese firms, known as Section 301. That includes tariffs of 25% on both U.S. soybeans and pork in July 2018 and a further 10% on pork and 5% on soybeans in September this year.

The waiver comes amid negotiations between the United States and China to conclude a ‘phase one’ or interim deal to de-escalate a 17-month trade war that has roiled financial markets, disrupted supply chains and weighed on global economic growth.

A deal had initially been expected last month, but the two sides are said to be still seeking agreement on major issues such as which tariffs to roll back and the size of U.S. farm purchases China is willing to make.

Though President Donald Trump struck an upbeat tone on progress in talks on Thursday, a new round of U.S. tariffs covering about $156 billion of Chinese imports is set to kick in just over a week away on Dec. 15.

China’s tariff waivers on key U.S. agricultural products is a sign of its commitment to the deal, said an industry source who declined to be identified because of the sensitivity of the matter.

“The goal (of this move) is to expand purchases and reassure the United States,” said a Chinese source who advises Beijing on the trade talks.

“It should be interpreted as a positive signal. Despite the many political difficulties the two sides face, economic and trade cooperation and moves to stop the escalation of the trade war are in the interest of both parties.”

Since late 2018, Washington has similarly exempted some Chinese goods from U.S. tariffs, even as the tone of the trade talks waxed and waned.

At end-October, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) began accepting tariff exclusion requests for Chinese goods subject to additional taxes in effect since Sept. 1.

Prior to that, 14 batches of exclusions for Chinese products had been granted between December 2018 and mid-October this year.

Washington imposed additional tariffs on about $125 billion worth of Chinese goods on Sept. 1, on top of 25% tariffs levied on an earlier $250 billion list of industrial and consumer goods.

U.S. SOYBEANS

Beijing’s levies on U.S. soybeans initially brought its purchases of the U.S.’ most valuable farm export to a virtual halt, although it has offered waivers to buyers in recent months.

(GRAPHIC: U.S. soybeans and pork product exports to China vs rest of world – https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/ce/7/7711/7693/USSoyPorkExpChinaRoW.png)

The Chinese government never made the details of these waivers public, however, as well as how to implement such waivers.

Those waivers are said to have expired, although new exemptions may come too late, said an analyst.

“December arrivals are already pretty high and then we’re getting into the Brazil crop,” said Darin Friedrichs, senior Asia commodity analyst at INTL FC Stone.

“There’s limited space to buy new U.S. soybeans at this point.”

Exemptions for pork are likely to be in higher demand, with less than two months until China’s Lunar New Year holiday, the country’s peak consumption period.

China has been scouring the world for more meat to fill a big shortage of protein after an outbreak of African swine fever devastated its massive hog herd, cutting supplies of pork.

U.S. pork exports to China and Hong Kong are already up 47% in volume terms from January to September, even with high duties in place.

A second adviser to the Chinese government said exemptions on the products suited Beijing, as they helped meet market demand for such goods while reducing the trade surplus with the United States.

“We might as well buy soybeans from the U.S. rather than from Brazil. Brazil is actually selling us what was purchased from the United States and they even hiked the prices up before selling to us. In that case, we’d better just buy from the United States,” she said.



China warns U.S. over Uighur bill, raising doubts over early trade deal By Reuters



By Se Young Lee and David Brunnstrom

BEIJING/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – China warned on Wednesday that the U.S. House of Representatives bill calling for a tougher U.S. response to Beijing’s treatment of its Uighur Muslim minority will impact bilateral cooperation, clouding prospects for a near-term deal to end a trade war.

Expectations of a quick deal had receded already, after U.S. President Donald Trump said on Tuesday that it might take until late 2020 to reach agreement.

The U.S. House’s approval of the Uighur Act of 2019, which still has to be approved by the Republican-controlled Senate before being sent to Trump, has angered Beijing and further strains an already testy relationship.

Several sources familiar with Beijing’s stance told Reuters that the bill could jeopardize the so-called phase one deal already fraught with disagreements and complications.

With a new round of U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods scheduled to take effect in less than two weeks, the possibility of another breakdown is growing.

“Do you think if America takes actions to hurt China’s interests we won’t take any action,” Chinese foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told reporters when asked whether the Uighur bill will affect the trade negotiations. “I think any wrong words and deeds must pay the due price.”

Negotiators have continued to work on the trade deal, but sources familiar with the talks say the two sides are still wrangling over the details including whether existing U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods will be removed and how much in additional U.S. agricultural products China will buy.

Bloomberg reported on Wednesday the U.S. and China are “moving closer” to agreeing on how much tariffs would be rolled back in a phase-one trade deal despite the Hong Kong and Xinjiang issues, citing people familiar with the talks.

U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC on Tuesday that staff-level trade negotiations with China were continuing but no high-level trade talks have been scheduled. The planned tariffs on remaining Chinese imports will take effect on Dec. 15 if there is no significant progress in the talks or a deal, he said.

Hua said China will not set any timeline or deadline for a trade deal and would take “decisive” countermeasures to defend its interests if Washington’s protectionism and bullying over trade continues. She did not elaborate on what the measures might be.

One Chinese official, who declined to be identified, warned that U.S. implementation of the new round of tariffs scheduled on Dec. 15 will be countered by China with retaliatory tariffs – an outcome that the official said would seriously disrupt ongoing negotiations.

Another Chinese government official, who declined to be identified, said it may take a very long time for Washington and Beijing to reach a deal if they cannot find a way to strike a deal while “the iron is hot.”

UIGHUR BILL

The Uighur bill, which was passed 407-1 in the Democratic-controlled House, requires the U.S. president to condemn abuses against Muslims and call for the closure of mass detention camps in its western region of Xinjiang. It calls on Trump to impose sanctions for the first time on a member of China’s powerful politburo, Xinjiang Communist Party Secretary Chen Quanguo.

Beijing called the bill a malicious attack on China, demanded the United States keep it from becoming law and said it would act to defend its interests as necessary. [L1N28D1TH]

The U.S. Embassy in China, in an e-mail statement, told Reuters it would not speculate on China’s possible counter-measures.

“We continue to call on the PRC to immediately release all those arbitrarily detained, and to end its draconian policies that for more than two years have terrorized its own citizens in Xinjiang,” the statement said referring to the initials of China’s official name, People’s Republic of China.

The White House has yet to say whether Trump would sign or veto the bill, which contains a provision allowing the president to waive sanctions if he determines that to be in the national interest.

Dilxat Raxit, spokesman for the World Uyghur Congress, said in a statement the House bill is an important action opposing “China’s continued push of extreme persecution” and that the organization looks forward to Trump signing it into law.

Analysts say China’s response to the passage of the Uighur bill could be stronger than its reaction to the U.S. law supporting Hong Kong protesters. Beijing said on Monday it banned U.S. military ships and aircraft from visiting the island and sanctioned several U.S.-based non-government organizations.

Global Times, an influential tabloid published by the official newspaper of China’s ruling Communist Party, tweeted on Tuesday that Beijing would soon release a so-called unreliable entities list imposing sanctions against those who harm China’s interests.

The paper said China was expediting the process for the list because the U.S. House bill would “harm Chinese firms’ interests”, and that “relevant” U.S. entities would be among the targets.



U.S. and China move closer to phase-one trade deal: Bloomberg By Reuters



(Reuters) – The United States and China are moving closer to agreeing on the amount of tariffs to be rolled back in a phase-one trade deal, Bloomberg reported on Wednesday, citing sources.

U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday had said a trade agreement with China might have to wait until after the U.S. presidential election in November 2020, denting hopes of a resolution soon to a dispute that has weighed on the world economy.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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Trump says China trade deal may have to wait amid sticking points in talks By Reuters


© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Trump meets Xi at the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan

By Steve Holland and William Schomberg

LONDON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump said on Tuesday a trade deal with China might have to wait until after the U.S. presidential election in November 2020, denting hopes that the two largest economies would soon reach an initial deal to ease their damaging trade war.

“I have no deadline, no,” Trump told reporters in London, where he was due to attend a meeting of NATO leaders.

“In some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal. But they want to make a deal now, and we’ll see whether or not the deal’s going to be right; it’s got to be right.”

Trump’s remarks sent stock prices tumbling and triggered a rush into safe assets such as U.S. Treasury debt. MSCI’s measure of global stock performance () slid 0.9%, while the U.S. benchmark S&P 500 Index () dropped 1.22%, its largest fall in nearly two months. Investors piled into government bonds, driving the yield on the 10-year U.S. Treasury note () to a one-month low near 1.7%. The dollar weakened against a basket () of key trading partners’ currencies. Trump’s comments came as sources in Beijing and Washington familiar with the talks said that the two countries have made progress, but are still wrangling over whether existing U.S. tariffs will be removed and over specific levels of Chinese purchases of U.S. agricultural products as part of a “phase one” trade deal.

“The Chinese side must have such a requirement, because the Chinese side has promised more U.S agricultural purchases. This is in a way, to some extent, a transaction,” a Chinese source who advises Beijing on the talks told Reuters.

A Washington-based source briefed on the talks said that the U.S. side is willing to remove some tariffs, but wants additional concessions from Beijing to curb the forced transfer of American technology to Chinese firms.

While the deal being discussed includes new protections for trademarks, copyrights and other intellectual property, trade sources have said it would leave the most difficult technology transfer issues to future talks.

Trade experts say the most likely tariffs to be removed would be 15% duties imposed on Sept. 1 on about $125 billion of Chinese consumer goods, including smart speakers, Bluetooth headphones, television sets and footwear.

But Trump’s most recent trade actions may leave Chinese officials concerned about whether he would uphold an initial deal.

On Monday, he said he would hit Brazil and Argentina with trade tariffs for “massive devaluation of their currencies”.

The United States then threatened duties of up to 100% on French goods, from champagne to handbags, because of a digital services tax that Washington says harms U.S. tech companies.

“All of these things are affecting the Trump administration’s credibility, but both sides have credibility problems,” said Scott Kennedy, a China economics expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.

NO IN-PERSON TALKS

U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross on Tuesday said that while staff-level talks are continuing with Chinese officials, no high-level meetings are scheduled.

If there is no deal or substantial progress in talks before Dec. 15, tariffs on remaining Chinese imports, including cell phones, laptop computers and toys, will take effect, Ross told CNBC on Tuesday.

“I think it’s also important that the president make clear: he’s under no time pressure to get it done. Because otherwise there’s a tendency of the other side to say ‘Oh, he needs it for political reasons, so we’ll give him a worse deal than we would.’ He’s not going to play that game.”

But Seema Shah, chief strategist at Principal Global Investors, said Trump could not afford a repeat of the stock market’s sharp falls in late 2018, when he raised the temperature of the trade stand-off.

“The Chinese government believes that President Trump is desperate for a deal before the end of the year, when the race for the presidential election will really heat up,” Shah said.

“Trump’s latest comments are a ploy to regain the upper hand in these negotiations.”

Washington and Beijing have yet to ink a “phase one” agreement announced in October, which had raised hopes of a de-escalation.

Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping had planned to meet and sign the preliminary trade deal at an Asia-Pacific leaders’ summit in Chile in mid-November, but the summit was canceled because of violent anti-government protests in Santiago.

Trump, who had said in September that he did not need a deal before the 2020 election, sought on Tuesday to put pressure on Beijing.

“The China trade deal is dependent on one thing – do I want to make it, because we are doing very well with China right now, and we can do even better with a flick of a pen,” he said. “And China is paying for it, and China is having by far the worst year that they have had in 57 years. So we’ll see what happens.”

China reported its slowest economic growth in 27 years in October as the trade tensions with the United States hit its manufacturing sector.

On Monday, before traveling to London, Trump said U.S. legislation backing protesters in Hong Kong was not making trade negotiations with China easier, but he believed Beijing still wanted a deal with the United States.



Trump says U.S. bill on Hong Kong doesn’t help China trade talks By Reuters


© Reuters. U.S. President Trump departs for travel to the United Kingdom at the White House in Washington

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday said U.S. legislation backing protesters in Hong Kong did not make trade negotiations with China easier, but added he believes Beijing still wants a deal with the United States.

The law “doesn’t make it better, but we’ll see what happens,” Trump said, talking to reporters. He gave no indication when the deal would be finalized.

Meanwhile, two top U.S. officials on Monday said a deal could still happen this year depending on China’s actions.

Washington and Beijing have yet to ink a so-called “phase one” trade agreement announced in October as the trade war between the world’s two largest economies enters its second year with tariffs on both sides rocking the global economy.

“The Chinese are always negotiating. I’m very happy where we are,” Trump said as he prepared to depart the White House for a NATO summit in London. “The Chinese want to make a deal. We’ll see what happens.”

Trump last week signed a new law backing protesters in Hong Kong and threatened China with possible sanctions on human rights. Beijing warned it could retaliate.

On Sunday, news site Axios reported the law had stalled the trade deal.

Trade experts and people close to the White House have said the agreement may not be signed until next year.

But White House adviser Kellyanne Conway separately told reporters at the White House on Monday that the deal was still possible before the end of the year.

U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, in a television interview, cited a further 15% U.S. tariff on about $156 billion worth of Chinese imports set to take effect Dec. 15 as a natural deadline and said time was running out for China to avoid it.

“If nothing happens between now and then, the president has made quite clear he’ll put the tariffs in,” Ross told Fox Business Network.

The fresh levy would land in the middle of the vital U.S. holiday shopping season, but Ross said it would not hurt holiday shopping because stores have already stocked up.

Asked if the Trump administration was willing to roll back current tariffs on China, Ross added: “It all depends on their behavior between now and then.”

Conway told reporters that phase one deal was still being written up. Ross said it would address Beijing purchases of U.S. farm products as well as some intellectual property and other structural reforms, but gave no other details.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



Yuan stable as China PMI expands after months of gloom By Investing.com


© Reuters.

Investing.com – The stayed relatively steady as forex markets began December with good news from China’s economy.

China’s (PMI) was recorded at 51.8 in November, up from a reading of 51.7 in October. On Friday, the official manufacturing PMI released by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) recorded a reading of 50.2, topping the 50 level that suggests expansion for the first time since April. The official non-manufacturing PMI came in at 54.4, the highest level since March.

The US dollar stayed little changed on Monday in Asia following the release of strong economic data in the US the previous week. The traded marginally higher early in the day, up 0.03% to 98.20 by 8:41 PM ET (01:40 GMT).

US-China trade talks remained in focus after the Global Times, a nationalist English-language tabloid in China with links to the Communist Party of China, tweeted that any phase one trade deal would require that the US roll back tariffs. The next batch of American tariffs on Chinese goods are due to take effect on Dec. 15.

Last week, U.S. President Donald Trump approved two bills that back Hong Kong’s anti-government protestors. The bills are mainly symbolic and have limited practical implications, but China has vowed to take strong measures in retaliation, although it has not yet announced any specific responses.

In mainland China, The People’s Bank of China (PBOC) set the reference rate for the yuan, the midpoint around which the currency is allowed to trade, at 7.0262, slightly weaker than the 7.0247 set on Friday.

The pair was down 0.14% to 1.2915. The pound has taken a number of hits recently as polls continue to suggest that Boris Johnson’s Conservatives are poised to win in elections on December 12, paving the way for a rapid Brexit.

The was up 0.4% to 1.1018.

The pair also gained in morning trading and was up 0.16% to 109.69. Signs continue to point towards more easing from the Bank of Japan.

The pair was up 0.16% to 0.6774 while the pair gained 0.37% to 0.6444.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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China suspends U.S. military visits to Hong Kong, sanctions U.S.-based NGOs By Reuters



BEIJING (Reuters) – China said on Monday U.S. military ships and aircraft won’t be allowed to visit Hong Kong, and also announced sanctions against several U.S. non-government organizations for encouraging protesters to “engage in extremist, violent and criminal acts.”

The measures were announced by China’s Foreign Ministry in response to U.S. legislation passed last week supporting anti-government protesters. It said it had suspended taking requests for U.S. military visits indefinitely, and warned of further action to come.

“We urge the U.S. to correct the mistakes and stop interfering in our internal affairs. China will take further steps if necessary to uphold Hong Kong’s stability and prosperity and China’s sovereignty,” said ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said at a daily news briefing in Beijing.

China last week promised it would issue “firm counter measures” after U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law the “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act,” which supports anti-government protesters in Hong Kong and threatens China with potential sanctions.

There are fears that the row over Hong Kong could impact efforts by Beijing and Washington to reach preliminary deal that could de-escalate a prolonged trade war between the two countries.

The U.S.-headquartered NGOs targeted by Beijing include the National Endowment for Democracy, the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs, the International Republican Institute, Human Rights Watch, and Freedom House.

“They shoulder some responsibility for the chaos in Hong Kong and they should be sanctioned and pay the price,” said Hua.

In more normal times, several U.S. naval ships visit Hong Kong annually, a rest-and-recreation tradition that dates back to the pre-1997 colonial era which Beijing allowed to continue after the handover from British to Chinese rule.

Visits have at times been refused amid broader tensions and two U.S. ships were denied access in August.

The USS Blue Ridge, the command ship of the Japanese-based Seventh Fleet, stopped in Hong Kong in April – the last ship to visit before mass protests broke out in June.

Foreign NGOs are already heavily restricted in China, and have previously received sharp rebukes for reporting on rights issues in the country including the mass detention of Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.